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Harvard Summer Program in Tbilisi, Georgia

Harvard Summer Program in Tbilisi, Georgia

Dates:  June 19 – August 11, 2017

2017 Faculty:  Professor Julie Buckler, Dr. Veronika Egorova

Advance your Russian-language skills while exploring Georgian culture, history, literature, and film, including Georgia’s longstanding cultural and political relationship with Russia. The ancient capital city of Tbilisi, which is rapidly developing itself for the twenty-first century, offers a distinctive and  fascinating site for urban studies and a guiding theme for your Russian-language learning.  We will undertake small-group fieldwork projects that allow us greater contact with the city and its residents, as well as opportunities to use Russian in real-world situations.  We’ll meet with city experts, writers, artists, preservationists, politicians, and NGOs.  You’ll also take several trips within Georgia – to Mtskheta, Davit Gareja, Gori, Borjomi, Batumi, and Kazbegi — to gain a deeper understanding of the Georgian nation and its regional context.
 
Program Structure 
Your studies include intermediate-Russian language courses every weekday and additional sessions two to three times each week, devoted to Tbilisi small-group urban fieldwork projects; Georgian culture, history, literature, film; and Russian literature and culture about the Caucasus. Note: A pre-departure introduction to Georgian language will be available for participants and additional non-credit Georgian language study may be arranged as part of the program in Tbilisi for those desiring to study Georgian.
 
Courses
RUSS S-BG Study Abroad in Tbilisi, Georgia: Intermediate Russian
This program counts as one full-year course (8 credits) of degree credit.
The Harvard Summer Program in Tbilisi, Georgia, provides students with a full course in intermediate-level Russian language instruction. Language study tracks the content of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences Russian B-level courses (equivalent to Russian Ba-Bb, Bta-Btb, or Bab), preparing students to continue in Advanced Russian/Third-Year (Russian 101-103); the program includes 140 hours of language instruction.  Our unique situation in Tbilisi also allows us to explore Georgian culture, history, literature, and film, including Georgia’s cultural and political relationship with Russia. The ancient capital city of Tbilisi, which is rapidly developing itself for the twenty-first century, offers a distinctive and  fascinating site for urban studies and a guiding theme for your Russian-language learning.  We will undertake small-group fieldwork projects that allow us greater contact with the city and its residents and opportunities to use Russian in real-world situations.  
 
Where You Live and Study 
Program participants will stay in double rooms at a small hotel convenient to the historical center of Tbilisi and to International School of Economics (ISET), where classes will be held. The hotel is also a short walk from the museum and arts district, and offers numerous shopping and restaurant opportunities nearby. All hotel rooms and the classrooms have air conditioning. Wifi is available at both the hotel and the university.
Daily breakfast and dinner will be provided at the hotel’s restaurant. Program participants will be responsible for lunchtime meals except for special program events. Georgian cuisine is a highlight this program, and participants will have ample opportunity to explore Tbilisi’s restaurants and cafes, which feature truly amazing food at very reasonable prices.

More information available at the Harvard Summer School Website:
 
Applications due by January 26, 2017.
 
For language-specific inquiries (involving intermediate Russian or the possibility of Georgian language study) please contact Prof. Steven Clancy <sclancy@fas.harvard.edu>. For broader questions about the Harvard in Tbilisi program, please contact the program leader, Prof. Julie Buckler <buckler@fas.harvard.edu>.

                                
 
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