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Cfp: The Annual Conference of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations.

Call For Proposals: English | French | German | Italian | Spanish

Conference website: dh2017.adho.org
Twitter: @dh17mtrl
Contact email: dh2017@adho.org


·         Paper/Poster/Panel deadline: 11:59pm GMT on 1 November 2016
·         Workshop endorsed by a SIG: 11:59pm GMT on 16 December 2016
·         Workshop/Tutorial proposal deadline: 11:59pm GMT on 17 February 2017

https://www.conftool.pro/dh2017/
 
I: GENERAL INFORMATION
The Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) invites submission of abstracts for its annual conference, on any aspect of digital humanities. This includes, but is not limited to:
  • Humanities research enabled through digital media, artificial intelligence or machine learning, software studies, or information design and modeling;
  • Social, institutional, global, multilingual, and multicultural aspects of digital humanities;
  • Computer applications in literary, linguistic, cultural, and historical studies, including public humanities and interdisciplinary aspects of modern scholarship;
  • Quantitative stylistics and philology, including big data and text mining studies;
  • Digital arts, architecture, music, film, theatre, new media, digital games, and electronic literature;
  • Emerging technologies such as physical computing, single-board computers, minimal computing, wearable devices, applied to humanities research; and
  • Digital humanities in pedagogy and academic curricula.
The theme of the 2017 conference is “Access/Accès”: contributions that focus on knowledge mobilization, public-facing scholarship, collaboration among scholars and communities, open access to code, software, research and results, and aspects of digital humanities research and publication involving accessibility technologies are particularly welcome. The conference will be officially bilingual in French and English, since Canada is a bilingual country: so we invite proposals for presentations particularly in both languages, as well as in the other official ADHO languages (German, Italian, Spanish).
Presentations may include:
  • Posters (abstract maximum 750 words)
  • Short papers (abstract maximum 1500 words)
  • Virtual short papers (abstract maximum 1500 words)
  • Long papers (abstract 1500 words)
  • Multiple paper sessions, including panels (regular abstracts + approximately 500-word overview)
  • Pre-conference workshops and tutorials (proposal maximum 1500 words)
The deadline for submitting poster, short paper, long paper, and multiple paper session proposals to the international Program Committee is 11:59pm GMT, 1 November 2016. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by 17 February 2017.
The deadline for submitting workshops proposed by a Special Interest Group (SIG) is 11:59pm GMT, 16 December 2016, with notice of acceptance by 30 January 2017.
The deadline for workshop and tutorial proposals is 11:59pm GMT, 17 February 2017, with notice of acceptance by 10 March 2017.

https://www.conftool.pro/dh2017/

When submitting proposals, previous Digital Humanities conference participants and reviewers should use their existing accounts rather than setting up new ones. If you have forgotten your username or password, please contact Program Committee Chair Diane Jakacki: diane {dot} jakacki {at} bucknell {dot} edu.
To facilitate the production of the conference proceedings, authors of accepted papers will be asked to submit final approved versions of their abstracts via the DHConvalidator, available through ConfTool, which creates a TEI text base of conference abstracts for further processing.
II: TYPES OF PROPOSALS
Proposals may be of seven types: (1) poster presentations; (2) short paper presentations; (3) virtual short paper presentations; (4) long papers; (5) three-paper, half-panel or full-panel sessions; (6) pre-conference workshops and tutorials; and (7) pre-conference workshops endorsed by a Special Interest Group. Based on peer review and its mandate to create a balanced and varied program, the Program Committee may offer acceptance in a different category from the one initially proposed. The committee will not normally accept more than a total of two submissions from one primary or co-author. Papers and posters may be given in English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish. For the first time at DH2017, the program committee will work towards encouraging widespread “whispering” – community ad hoc translation and/or multilingual resources, like visual aids – to foster and facilitate exchanges and dialogue among practitioners in the two languages of the conference as well as the other ADHO official languages.
Poster Presentations
Poster proposals (500 to 750 words) may describe work on any relevant topic or offer project and software demonstrations. Posters are appropriate for projects in early stages of development and for demonstrations of tools and platforms. Poster presentations are intended to be interactive with the opportunity to exchange ideas one-on-one with attendees.
Short Papers
Short paper proposals (750 to 1500 words) are appropriate for reporting on experiments or works in progress or for describing newly conceived tools or software in early stages of development. This category of presentation allows for up to five short papers in a single session, with the length held to a strict 10 minutes each in order to allow time for questions.
Virtual Short Papers
For DH 2017 the Local Organizers have agreed to experiment with the inclusion of a special virtual track for short paper presentations. Submission parameters remain the same as with the short papers: proposals (750 to 1500 words) that report on experiments or works in progress or that describe newly conceived tools or software in early stages of development. While the intent of this track will be on bi-directional communication, presenters will be expected to produce in advance a video of their presentation of no more than 10 minutes in length, in case of technical difficulties with a real-time connection. Proposals in this category should specify the virtual track in the abstract. Please, note that the presenters accepted for a virtual short paper will have also to register for the conference.
Long Papers
Proposals for long papers (750 to 1500 words) are appropriate for substantial, completed, and previously unpublished research; reports on the development of significant new methodologies or digital resources; and/or rigorous theoretical, speculative, or critical discussions. Individual papers will be allocated 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions.
Proposals relating to the development of new computing methodologies or digital resources should indicate how the methods are applied to research and/or teaching in the humanities and what their impact has been in formulating and addressing research questions; they should also include critical assessments of their application in the humanities. Papers that concentrate on a particular tool or digital resource should cite traditional as well as computer-based approaches to the problem and should include critical assessments of the computing methodologies used. All proposals should include relevant citations to sources in the literature.
Multiple Paper Sessions
These consist usually of one 90-minute panel of four to six speakers or three long papers on a single theme. For DH 2017, we also invite proposals for one 45-minute panel of two to three speakers. Panel organizers should submit an abstract of 750 to 1500 words describing the panel topic, how it will be organized, the names of all the speakers, and an indication that each speaker is willing to participate in the session.
All paper session organizers should submit a statement of approximately 500 words describing the session topic, include abstracts of 750 to 1500 words for each paper, and indicate that each author is willing to participate in the session. Papers that are submitted as part of a special session may not be submitted individually for consideration in another category. Since the conference offers an important occasion to attract new scholars to specific research areas, those submitting proposals for panels and paper sessions are advised to ensure that the constitution of the panel either reflects the constitution of the field and/or research topic that is being addressed or explicitly address problems in that area. In case the proposer’s own network is too limited, the Program Committee can advise them on whom to contact to broaden the panel.
Pre-Conference Workshops and Tutorials
Participants in pre-conference workshops and tutorials will be expected to register for the full conference as well as pay a small additional fee. Tutorials are normally intensive introductions to specific techniques, software packages or theoretical approaches with a small number of participants. Workshop proposals may take many forms, including proposals with a full slate of speakers and presentations, as well as proposals to issue an independent call for papers from which submissions will be chosen.
Proposals should provide the following information:
  • Title and brief description of the content or topic and its relevance to the digital humanities community (not more than 1500 words);
  • Full contact information for all tutorial instructors or workshop leaders, including a one-paragraph statement summarizing their research interests and areas of expertise;
  • Description of target audience and expected number of participants (based, if possible, on past experience); and
  • Special requirements for technical support.
Additionally, tutorial proposals should include:
  • A brief outline showing that the core content can be covered in a half-day (approximately 3 hours, plus breaks). In exceptional cases, full-day tutorials may be supported.
And workshop proposals must include:
  • Intended length and format of the workshop (minimum half-day; maximum one-and-a-half days);
  • Proposed budget (as workshops are expected to be self-financing); and
  • If the workshop is to have its own call for participation, a deadline and date for notification of acceptances, and a list of individuals who have agreed to be part of the workshop’s Program Committee.
Workshops endorsed by a SIG:
Workshops endorsed by a SIG and focused on a topic related to the concerned SIG are required to follow the same instructions as other workshops, but proposers should also note that:
  • They have to be endorsed by a SIG
  • The deadline application is earlier (see above)
  • They should have at least 10 confirmed participants
III: ADHO CONFERENCE CODE OF CONDUCT
The Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) is dedicated to creating a safe, respectful, and collegial conference environment for the benefit of everyone who attends and for the advancement of research and scholarship in fields supported by our constituent organizations. The ADHO Digital Humanities conference Code of Conduct is available athttp://adho.org/administration/conference-coordinating-program-committee/adho-conference-code-conduct.
IV: VENUE AND THEME
DH2017 will take place in Montréal, Canada, and is hosted jointly by McGill University and Université de Montréal. The local organizers are Stéfan Sinclair and Michael Sinatra. This is the first time that the annual conference will be officially bilingual in French and English, which befits the world’s second Francophone city. The theme of “Access/Accès” underscores the conference organizers’ commitment to making the event more attainable financially, linguistically, and logistically for digital humanities scholars.
V: BURSARIES FOR EARLY-CAREER AND EMERGING SCHOLARS
The Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations will offer a limited number of bursaries for early-career scholars presenting at the conference. Application guidelines will appear on the ADHO website later this year: http://www.adho.org

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