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CFP: 2nd International Workshop on Computational History and Data-Driven Humanities.

CFP: 2nd International Workshop on Computational History and Data-Driven Humanities
http://kdeg.scss.tcd.ie/2nd-international-workshop-computational-history-and-data-driven-humanities
This workshop is an IFIP Joint Event supported by the IFIP Working Group 12.7 on Social Semantics and Collective Intelligence (http://www.ifip.org/bulletin/bulltcs/memtc12.htm#wg127).

Scope:
This workshop focuses on the challenges and opportunities of data-driven humanities and seeks to bring together world-leading scientists and scholars at the forefront of this emerging field, at the interface between computer science, social science, humanities and mathematics.

As historical knowledge becomes increasingly available in forms that computers can process, this data becomes amenable to large-scale computational analysis and interpretation. what are the impacts for humanities, social sciences, computer science and complex systems? Perhaps mathematical analysis of the dynamic, evolutionary patterns observed in the data helps us to better understand the past and can even produce empirically-grounded predictions about the future.

We seek
* computer scientists and digital humanities experts to introduce technologies and tools they have applied in order to extract knowledge from historical records in a form that can be processed by computers without losing its meaningfulness.
* scientists working at the forefront of mathematical and theoretical analysis of historical data, to describe what is possible with current tools.

* Keynote speaker:
Prof. Harvey Whitehouse, University of Oxford, UK - Understanding Social Complexity through Data

*Important dates:
Full Paper submission due: 31 March 2016
Acceptance Notification: 30 April 2016
Camera ready deadline: 13 May 2016
Date of the workshop: 25th May 2016

* Topics of interest:
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
- Ontologies and linked data vocabularies for historical data
- Data curation for research in the humanities and social sciences
- Data visualisation for the humanities and social sciences
- Constructing big data for research in the humanities
- Text- and data-mining of historical and archival material.
- data-driven transdisciplinary research
- data-driven historical macrosociology
- data-driven cultural and social evolution
- data-driven economic history/cliometrics
- mathematical modeling of long-term social processes
- construction and analysis of historical datasets

*Highlights:
All accepted papers will be published by Springer and made available through IFIP Digital Library, one of the world's largest scientific libraries. Proceedings will be submitted for indexing by Google Scholar, ISI, EICompendex, Scopus and many more. Accepted papers after presentation and extension may be invited to be published in a special issue of Cliodynamics:The Journal of Quantitative History and Cultural Evolution (e-ISSN: 2373-7530) and indexed by Scopus.

* Organizing committee:
Dr. Bojan Bozic (co-chair), KDEG, TCD
Dr. Gavin Mendel-Gleason (co-chair), KDEG, TCD
Dr. Christophe Debruyne (co-chair), ADAPT/KDEG, TCD

* Steering committee:
Prof. Declan O'Sullivan (general chair), ADAPT/KDEG, TCD
Prof. Peter Turchin, UConn, USA
Dr. Kevin Feeney, ADAPT/KDEG, TCD
Dr. Rob Brennan, ADAPT/KDEG, TCD

* Program Committee
Aidan Kane, NUI Galway, Ireland
Arkadiusz Marciniak, AMU Poznan, Poland
Daniel Hoyer, University of Hertfordshire, UK
Daniel Mullins, University of Hertfordshire, UK
Douglas R. White, University of California, USA
Enrico Spolaore, University of Exeter, UK
Harvey Whitehouse , University of Oxford, UK
Ian Milligan, University of Waterloo, Canada
Jodi Schneider, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Leif Isaksen, University of Southampton, UK
Peter N. Peregrine, Lawrence University, USA
Peter Turchin, University of Connecticut, USA
Pieter Francois, University of Hertfordshire, UK
Thomas E. Currie, University of Exeter, UK
(List currently not complete)

--
Ian Milligan
Assistant Professor
Department of History, Faculty of Arts
University of Waterloo
200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1
P 519-888-4567, ext. 32775
C 519-807-7279
Skype: ian.e.milligan
ianmilligan.ca/

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