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Cfp: Web Archives 2015: Capture, Curate, Analyze-November 12-13, 2015 at the University of Michigan!

Call for Proposals:

Web Archives 2015: Capture, Curate, Analyze
November 12-13, 2015 at the University of Michigan

Proposal deadline: May 15, 2015

The University of Michigan Library and Bentley Historical Library are proud to announce Web Archives 2015: Capture, Curate, Analyze, a two day symposium to be held on November 12-13, 2015 at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor).  For more information on this event, please see http://www.lib.umich.edu/webarchivesconference

Proposals may be submitted via email to webarc2015@umich.edu

Overview:

Research in almost all disciplines increasingly relies on evidence gleaned from websites, social media platforms, and other online resources.  As scholars and instructors embrace these primary sources and discover new and innovative ways to interact with the data, their efforts are aligned--knowingly or not--with those of developers and archivists.  

While each of these communities recognize the web’s significance as an object and subject of research, questions about their respective assumptions, methodologies, and practices remain: 
  • How do collecting policies and appraisal decisions shape web archives?  
  • How can web archives be effectively integrated with classroom instruction and academic discourse in general?  
  • How do available resources and technologies influence the extent and success of web captures?  
  • How do scholars want to access and interact with web archives?  
  • How can individual scholars ensure that the materials that they need will be available both for their research and for documenting their work?  
  • What tools can optimize the use and reuse of archived websites and online materials?  
  • What measures of confidence does the academic community have in the use of archived websites for research?  
  • How can librarians, archivists, and technologists preserve the functionality and utility of complex web resources over the long-term?
Proposals are welcome from librarians, archivists, faculty, researchers, developers, practitioners, students, and other interested parties; we are especially interested in papers and workshops that address:
  • The role of libraries, archives and museums in building and sustaining curated web collections.
  • Methods and tools for preserving and curating online materials.
  • Resources and best practices to promote access to and use of preserved websites and social media platforms.
  • On-demand web archiving and the creation of public web archives for documenting research.
  • Descriptive and citation practices for web archives.
  • Approaches to studying and analyzing web archive data.
  • Pedagogical strategies for teaching in the archive and with archival data.
  • Analysis of web and social media materials as cultural documents.
  • Preservation threats (such as technological and format obsolescence) that could impact the rendering and use of archived web content over the long-term. 
Presentation formats include:
  • Workshops - lead a hands-on session in which you introduce tools, techniques, or methods to other conference participants (75 minutes in length)
  • Paper presentations - present your own research related to topics listed above (20 minutes)
  • Panel presentations - curate 3-4 presentations that are thematically related (75 minutes)
Proposal instructions:

Please send an email with your proposal to webarc2015@umich.edu. Clearly indicate your proposed format and include a 200-300 word abstract, along with brief biographical statements for each participant. Proposals must be received by May 15, 2015.

About the Hosts:

The University of Michigan Library is one of the world's largest academic research libraries and serves a vibrant university community that is home to 19 schools and colleges, 100 top ten graduate programs, and annual research expenditures approaching $1.5 billion a year. To enable the university's world-changing work and to serve the public good, the library collects, preserves, and shares the scholarly and cultural record in all existing and emerging forms, and leads the reinvention of the academic research library in the digital age.

The Bentley Historical Library collects the materials for and promotes the study of the histories of two great, intertwined institutions, the State of Michigan and the University of Michigan.  The library’s holdings include materials from more than 10,000 individual and organizational donors and comprise more than 45,000 linear feet of primary source material, 10,000 maps, 80,000 printed volumes, and 1.5 million photographs in addition to extensive collections of of digitized and born-digital archives.  The Bentley launched its web archiving program in 2000 to complement its holdings and advance its mission of documenting the university and state.  Since joining a subscription service in 2010, staff have employed essential archival principles and strategies to create a focused collection of more than 1,500 archived websites, with more than 3.7 TB of data.  

For more information on this event, please see http://www.lib.umich.edu/webarchivesconference

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