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Showing posts from November, 2014

Research fellowships at Davis Center for Historical Studies, Princeton. The 2015/16 topic: “In the Aftermath of Catastrophe.”

During the academic years 2014/15 and 2015/16, the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies will focus on the topic of “In the aftermath of catastrophe.”  What happens in the wake of cataclysmic experiences:  war, civil war, genocide, imperial collapse, natural disaster?  The aim in part is to understand processes of reconstruction but not only that.  How was the experience of catastrophe remembered and memorialized; how was trauma conceived and dealt with; how was the post-catastrophic present understood in relation to the pre-disaster past?  As always, we hope to address these questions from a wide variety of periods and places, from prehistory to the present and from all parts of the world. The Center will offer a limited number of research fellowships for one or two semesters, running from September to January and from February to June.  Early career scholars must have their doctoral degrees in hand at the time of the application.  Fellows are expected to live…

Call for articles for Temporalités n° 22 (2015/2) — « Temporalités et mutations du monde russe et post-soviétique » - “Temporalities and Mutations in the Russian and Post-Soviet World”

Call for articles for Temporalités n° 22 (2015/2) —

« Temporalités et mutations du monde russe et post-soviétique » - “Temporalities and Mutations in the Russian and Post-Soviet World” Coordination Natalia Leclerc (UBO) and Anne Le Huérou (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre, ISP, CERCEC) Twenty-three years after the disappearance of the Soviet Union, the words and concepts with which to capture the reality of contemporary Russia have evolved.  Within the interpretative framework of temporality, in other words a plural conception of human temporalities as opposed to an objectified concept of uniform and continuous time, various interpretations of the changes undergone compete with one another: if the notion of a revolutionary change has never caught on, approaches focusing on “the transition” have been rapidly superseded by other modes of apprehension using the concepts of path dependency, of transformations and mutations that go far beyond that of a simple change of regime, whi…

CFP: Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars Very Bad Things: Material Culture and Disobedience

CFP: Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars Very Bad Things: Material Culture and Disobedience
Call for Proposals—2015 Emerging Scholars Symposium
Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Saturday, April 11, 2015
The Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware invites submissions for papers to be given at the Thirteenth Annual Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars.
What happens when a thing goes bad?  What is an unruly object and how does it get that way? Can an object get out of control? Can it be disobedient? Some things go bad; are some things born bad? How do things express our own dissatisfaction and deviance?
We seek papers that explore the recalcitrance of things, papers that interrogate the way objects can reflect human frustration or discontent, and papers that investigate the moments when objects resist our intentions or confound our expectations. At these vital junctures, things expand beyond the limits of the human imaginatio…

CFP: Technology and Romanticism, special issue of The Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons

CFP: Technology and Romanticism, special issue of The Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons
The conference organizers are soliciting essays for a special issue of The Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons focused on technology in Romanticism courses. Selected essays will represent two aspects of technology: the technologies we use in the classroom to teach students about Romanticism and integrating information about the technologies used by Romantic-era writers and readers into literature courses.
Topics might include: Classroom uses of digital archives, collections, and/or databases Thematic units, activities, and/or assignments on Romantic-period technologies Applications of quantitative analysis tools in the undergraduate and graduate classroom Student-generated digital projects and websites (including assignments and assessment guidelines) Romanticists as educators and public intellectuals in the digital/social media age Romantic literature in hybrid classrooms The conference organizers are espe…

New Electronic Resource: Archive of Arab literature and cultural Magazines since 1880 till 2010.

Archive of Arab literature and cultural Magazines since 1880 till 2010. The Archive covers all Arabic countries. http://archivebeta.sakhrit.com It contains more than 110 magazines and has about 10,000 issues, 28,000 writers, and 1,200.000 pages. Source: Magdi El Faramawi - Business Development Manager Arab Literary and Cultural Magazines Archive – Modern Arab Lexicon E-mail                 : magdi.faramawi@gmail.com Mobile Phone     : +2010 0506 2078 : +2012 2051 1144 : +2011 5699 1162

CDL: Announcing The Dash Tool: Data Sharing Made Easy.

Announcing The Dash Tool: Data Sharing Made Easy





We are pleased to announce the launch ofDash– a new self-service tool from theUC Curation Center (UC3)and partners that allows researchers to describe, upload, and share their research data. Dash helps researchers perform the following tasks: ·Prepare data for curation by reviewing best practice guidance for the creation or acquisition of digital research data. ·Select data for curation through local file browse or drag-and-drop operation. ·Describe data in terms of the DataCite metadata schema. ·Identify data with a persistent digital object identifier (DOI) for permanent citation and discovery. ·Preserve, manage, and share data by uploading to a publicMerritt repositorycollection. ·Discover and retrieve data through faceted search and browse.

Cfp: Outside of Russia-at UPenn.

Outside of Russia
A graduate conference presented by The Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory,  The Jewish Studies Program, and Slavics Without Borders
Friday, March 19-20, 2015
  University of Pennsylvania
       Keynote Speaker: Thomas Lahusen (University of Toronto)
“The Russian sufferer of history, whose appearance in our society, uprooted from among the people, was a historic necessity…These homeless Russian wanderers are wandering still, and the time will be long before they disappear.”
- Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Speech In honor of Pushkin. (1880)

“A boundary is necessary in order not to get nations confused. With us, for example, a border guard stands there and he knows absolutely that the boundary isn’t a fiction or an emblem, because on one side of it people speak Russian and drink more and on the other they speak non-Russian and drink less.”
- Venedikt Erofeev, Moscow-Petushki. (1970)
The close of the nineteenth century brought the first great wave of emigration out of the…