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Showing posts from April, 2013

Conference at Princeton: “ILLUSIONS KILLED BY LIFE”: AFTERLIVES OF (SOVIET) CONSTRUCTIVISM

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies Program in Russian and Eurasian Studies Princeton Conjunction – 2013:
An Annual Interdisciplinary Conference “ILLUSIONS KILLED BY LIFE”:
AFTERLIVES OF (SOVIET) CONSTRUCTIVISM May 10-12, 2013
Princeton 219 Aaron Burr Hall http://afterlivesofconstructivism.wordpress.com/
CONFERENCE PROGRAM MAY 10, 2013
9.30 am – 11.00pm
PANEL 1: WHAT IS CONSTRUCTIVISM?
CHAIR: Ellen Chances (Princeton University) Tina Di Carlo (Oslo School of Architecture and Design)
Constructivist Deconstructivist? Pablo Mueller (City University of New York)
Shaping “October”: The Reception of Soviet Constructivism by the American Art Journal Kristin Romberg (The College of Wooster)
The Tectonics of Minimalism DISCUSSANT: Yve-Alain Bois (Institute for Advance Study, Princeton) 11.00am – 11.30am – break
11.30pm – 1.30pm
PANEL 2: VISION IN MOTION
CHAIR: Hal Foster (Princeton University)
John Tyson (Emory University)
Hans Haacke’s Discrepant Constructivism

Berkeley-Stanford Platonov Workshop

Berkeley-Stanford Platonov Workshop May 11, 2013: Board Room, Humanities Center, Stanford Hosted by Eric Naiman (Berkeley) and Nariman Skakov (Stanford)
Program
10.00-10.15     Welcome address by Eric Naiman and Nariman Skakov 10.15-12.00     First panel
1.Jason Cieply (Stanford) ‘Platonov and the Use of Enthusiastic Consciousness for Life’ 2.Emily Laskin (Berkeley) ‘“Я против теории”: Platonov and Stalinism’ 3.David Parker (Stanford) ‘“O splendid 19th century, you were wrong!”: Fascism in Platonov’s ‘Musornyi veter’ and ‘Po nebu polunochi’’
Respondent: Evgeny Dobrenko (Professor and Head of Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies, University of Sheffield, UK)
12.00-1.00       Lunch 1.00-2.45         Second panel

Digital Mishnah Project

The Digital Mishnah Project represents a solid hybridization of technology with humanities and social sciences in the contemporary North American setting. The project's self description is as follows, "The Mishnah is a rabbinic legal text edited around 200 CE/AD. It serves as the basis of the Talmud, and is a fundamental document of the rabbinic Jewish tradition. It is also a vital document of the history of the Jews and of Palestine in the Roman period. A critical edition is one that encapsulates data and scholarly judgment about the history of the text. Generally, this involves using comparison of readings from manuscripts or other witnesses that provide knowledge of the history of the text. Because this edition is born digital it can dynamically compare manuscript readings and provide tools to the." The project can be accessed here: http://www.digitalmishnah.org/